Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Personal Independence Payments’

Kloey Clarke at home in Devizes, with her son Seth. Photograph: Adrian Sherratt for the Guardian

This week more disturbing news has broken concerning the way our society treats mental health problems compared with physical illness.  flagged this up in a Guardian article last Wednesday. He stated:

The evidence is mounting that people with mental health problems in particular are being failed by PIPs, with claimants reporting that the new system takes no account of the needs of people with conditions ranging from schizophrenia to severe depression. Figures released by the DWP in October showed that complaints about the PIP assessment process increased by 880% last year. The number of complaints that were upheld rose similarly dramatically, by 713%.

Below is a short extract: for the full post see link.

Kloey Clarke, 28, from Devizes in Wiltshire, has had severe anxiety and type II bipolar disorder for six years. “I’m scared to leave the house,” says Clarke, who does not feel emotionally or physically stable enough to hold down a job and relies on her husband for care and support. “I have a constant fear of dying. I can’t socialise and I can’t communicate outside [the house].” For four years, Clarke depended on a Disability Living Allowance (DLA). The DLA was replaced by Personal Independence Payments (PIPs) in 2012 – and phased in from 2013 – but she was receiving them for less than a year before she was reassessed by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and told she no longer qualified.

Clarke believes that the assessment for PIP is aimed at people with physical disabilities and does not account for mental illness. “I was asked if I could walk 200 metres unaided. No, I don’t need a stick or an aid, but I do need my husband or someone with me. Can I talk to people face to face? I talk to my family when they visit, but can I speak to strangers? No.”

She has had panic attacks as a consequence of losing her benefits, she says, and her family is now struggling financially. They have had to visit food banks twice since being rejected for PIP, but Clarke’s pride has stopped her from going more frequently. “I just find it so degrading. I don’t feel as if I should be there. I feel that, if I just had what I deserve, then I wouldn’t need to be in that place; I wouldn’t need to take food from, say, homeless people.”

Clarke’s marriage and her relationship with her children are suffering. “I’m useless to them, I’m not half the mum that I could be. I haven’t got enough funds. The government has no idea what these types of assessments do to people with mental health [issues]; how much it takes to walk into that room and talk about something so personal and then be told you aren’t ill enough.”

Advertisements

Read Full Post »